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More from Dr. Naviaux on metabolics and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Dr. Naviaux has responded to some comments on the groundbreaking paper, “Metabolic Features of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”.

In this response he addresses the need for metabolic studies in other disease groups, whether metabolic studies determine the initial cause of sysmptoms, and how dauer states relate to what is seen in CFS.

We thank Vogt et al. for their comments (1). We respond to their three points in order. First, we are aware of the need to extend future metabolomics studies to include other disease groups. We stated this fact in the discussion of ref. 2 and are validating the results in independent cohorts. The detailed biochemical phenotype or signature that we found provides a first glimpse at a previously hidden biology. For example, disturbances in sphingolipid metabolism have important implications for immunobiology and neuroendocrine regulation relevant to myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME)/chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (3). Sphingolipids are important mediators of the cell danger response (CDR) (4), and the CDR is an important regulator of the behavioral and functional changes produced by infection, and associated with sickness behavior (5). The biochemical phenotype of ME/CFS is distinct from other diseases that Vogt et al. (1) named. For example, in heart failure, metabolomics shows that long chain acyl-carnitines are increased (6), but these long chain acyl-carnitines were not changed in ME/CFS (2). In our view, chemistry and metabolism underlie all aspects of human biology. Our studies show that metabolomics can be used as a new lens to reveal unexpected biology that was invisible before…

Robert Naviaux, et all

Read full response.
Read the letter the response was based on.

PARTICIPATE in metabolomics research at SISOH.

Support CFS/ME Research by Shopping at AmazonSmile

Now you can support Gordon Medical’s research into CFS/ME and other chronic illness by shopping at AmazonSmile. Just use the link here in the post and your purchases will help support Gordon Medical Research Center’s fundraising efforts. For eligible purchases at AmazonSmile, the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to the customer’s selected charitable organization. AmazonSmile is the same Amazon you know. Same products, same prices, same service.

We hope you select us!

 

We are currently fundraising for the Analyzing Individual Metabolomics Study (AIMS), our third research study on the use of metabolomics in CFS/ME. Our first study resulted in the ground breaking research, “Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome,” published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Our second study, a replication study with a larger group of CFS patients, has completed enrollment, and is processing the data collected. Our thirds study, AIMS, is now recruiting participants and fundraising. We will be looking at how comprehensive metabolomics analysis can be used to evaluate CFS/ME. AIMS builds on our previous studies, which have demonstrated there is a clear metabolomic profile in patients with CFS/ME. The more funds we are able to raise, the more participants we can include in this important research. To find out more about our research, or to sign up to participate, go to our research website at Science in Service of Humanity (SISOH). You can also make a tax deductible donation directly to the Gordon Medical Research Center.

Huffington Post: Millions Are Missing: Will The World Finally Notice?

Maureen Hanson
Researcher; Geneticist; Professor, Cornell University

This week, demonstrations occurred in 25 global cities world-wide to focus attention on a neglected, devastating disease — Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), an illness that also goes by the misleading name Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). At this event, the most powerful demonstrators were those who could not attend — the bedridden and housebound patients.

The protest, named Millions Missing, has been organized by #MEAction, a patient/caregiver group. What millions are missing? Millions of people across the globe are missing the ability to lead normal lives, millions of dollars have been missing from what should be a government-funded research effort, and few of the more than 10 million doctors in the world have been properly educated as to the seriousness of the disease and how to diagnosis it.

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The Most Important and Groundbreaking Study of ME/CFS to Date

 in Clinical Pain Advisor
September 27, 2016

Metabolomic Deficiencies Characteristic of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

In a study designed to test the utility of targeted metabolomics in the diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), researchers identified a unique chemical signature that differentiates affected patients from healthy individuals.

Ronald W. Davis, PhD, director of Stanford Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Center of Stanford University School of Medicine commented on the findings of Dr. Naviaux’s group on the the Open Medicine Foundation website, where he serves as director of the Scientific Advisory Board.

“It is the most important and groundbreaking study of ME/CFS to date. Extending recent indications of metabolic alterations in ME/CFS, this study provides the first comprehensive, quantitative demonstration of the metabolomic deficiencies that characterize the disease.”

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Eric Gordon, co-author on CFS metabolomics study, to speak at Millions Missing Rally in San Francisco

millions-missing-campaignEric Gordon, MD, co-author of the groundbreaking study, “Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome“, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, will be speaking at the Millions Missing San Francisco rally as part of the global protest for ME/CFS rights.

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